(308) 324-2386

In their first year as members of Dawson PPD’s Board, Tyler Kugler, David Pieper and Mary Wroblewski have learned a lot. Their commitment to their constituents (that’s you) and the sustainability of Dawson PPD remains unwavering.

The initial year for any board member can be like drinking water from a fire hose. However, 2023 brought some unique situations into light.

These directors joined Dawson PPD while leadership was carefully examining a proposed merger with The Central Nebraska Public Power and Irrigation District, an idea brought forward in 2020 and was later voted down by CNPPID Board Members in July.

Dawson PPD was also grappling with soaring material prices and supply chain disruptions as the economy continues to recover after the COVID-19 pandemic.

Together with fellow Dawson PPD Board Members and staff, Kugler, Pieper and Wroblewski have addressed these opportunities and issues head-on, ensuring Dawson PPD’s continued success.

Step into the board room and as we reflect on their inagural year. Learn about their unexpected experiences, the challenges they’ve faced, their balancing acts between board responsibilities and personal commitments, and their goals for the remainder of their terms.

Tyler Kugler

Tyler Kugler, Dawson Subdivision

Reflecting on your first year as a Dawson PPD Board Member, what have you found to be the most surprising or unexpected aspect of the role?

The time commitment is a lot more than you’d expect. You think it’s just one meeting a month, but there’s more meetings and classes you can take to improve yourself. It also surprised me that the power grid is not as simple as it seems. We’re all connected literally and figuratively, and what we do here will impact our neighbors and the whole state.

Board membership often comes with unique challenges. Can you share a specific challenge you faced in the past year and how you navigated through it?

The amount of acronyms and knowing what they mean to the electrical utility industry. Until you understand all of them, it can be difficult to follow board conversations. I was given a multiple-page list of acronyms that I kept out at meetings when I first started. It’s also been a learning experience trying to understand the unique position public power plays and how its financials and rates are determined.

Board membership can demand a significant time commitment. How have you managed to balance your responsibilities as a board member with your other professional or personal commitments?

I’ve found that it’s a lot of pick and choose outside of the monthly board meeting. My family comes first but when I have availability, I try to attend as many classes as possible.

Looking ahead, what are your main objectives or aspirations as a board member for the remainder of your term?

I hope to fully understand everything in the next five years. I’d like to go to each organization’s meeting. I enjoy the comradery and learning more about the industry while networking at these meetings. I also hope to obtain my Credentialed Cooperative Director Certificate through the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.

David Pieper

David Pieper, Lincoln Subdivision

Reflecting on your first year as a Dawson PPD Board Member, what have you found to be the most surprising or unexpected aspect of the role?

The sheer scope of Dawson PPD and its involvement beyond its service territory. Dawson PPD coordinates with larger entities like Nebraska Public Power District, the Southwest Power Pool and the Western Area Power Administration to ensure safe, reliable and affordable electricity for all Nebraskans. As public power, we rely on our neighbors and work together toward a common goal.

Board membership often comes with unique challenges. Can you share a specific challenge you faced in the past year and how you navigated through it?

Trying to get up to speed to vote on the potential merger with The Central Nebraska Public Power and Irrigation District. Although in the end I did not have to vote, I feel like I’m better for it. There was a lot to learn but I gained so much knowledge up front that I may not have obtained until later in my term. (Editor’s note: The merger discussion among the Dawson PPD and CNPPID Boards began in 2020, and Pieper began his term in 2023. In July 2023, the CNPPID Board voted on a motion to merge, but lacked enough votes to approve it. Therefore, there was no need for the Dawson PPD Board to vote on the measure.)

Board membership can demand a significant time commitment. How have you managed to balance your responsibilities as a board member with your other professional or personal commitments?

The decision to run for the Dawson PPD Board was made by my whole family, not just me. We discussed it and understood that if I were elected, we’d need others to step up and keep the farm operating smoothly. They’re the reason why I’m able to serve. This position has taken more time than I expected – but I think that goes with any board. I’ve heard the phrase “if you need something done you ask a busy person,” and I think it’s so true. All of us on the Dawson PPD Board are busy but we are committed and make time for our responsibilities.

Looking ahead, what are your main objectives or aspirations as a board member for the remainder of your term?

I know that I have so much more that I need to learn to provide the District and our customers with the reliable and quality service they deserve. I hope to obtain several board education certificates by the end of my term.

Mary “Liz” Wroblewski

Mary Wroblewski, Buffalo Subdivision

Reflecting on your first year as a Dawson PPD Board Member, what have you found to be the most surprising or unexpected aspect of the role?

The most surprising aspects of being a board member is the complexity of the business. There is so much I don’t know but I’m learning. Another unexpected aspect is the comradery of the board directors and how supportive they are of one another.

Board membership often comes with unique challenges. Can you share a specific challenge you faced in the past year and how you navigated through it?

The unique challenge I faced was becoming familiar with the vocabulary and acronyms of the electrical business. Fortunately, I was able to navigate through it with the help of the current directors. They were cognizant of this and answered any of my questions.

Board membership can demand a significant time commitment. How have you managed to balance your responsibilities as a board member with your other professional or personal commitments?

When I ran for the board, I made the decision to do the best I could to represent my constituents. I feel it is my responsibility to attend meetings and take courses to keep informed. By being informed, I’m able to make good decisions for the members.

Looking ahead, what are your main objectives or aspirations as a board member for the remainder of your term?

My main objective as a board member is two-fold. First, I want to keep public power public and continue to provide affordable, reliable electricity to those who elected me. Second, as a personal goal, I want to become a National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Credentialed Cooperative Director (CCD) by next year followed by the Board Leadership Certificates. I feel this can help me govern more effectively on the board.

OTHER NEWS

Notice to bidders

Notice to bidders

NOTICE TO BIDDERS Substation Construction Project Sealed proposals for the construction, including the supply of necessary labor, equipment and some materials for two rural electric projects of Dawson Public Power District, (hereinafter called the “Owner”) to be known...

read more
Translate »